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Home of the big cats! (And sometimes medium and also small sized wild cats.) This blog aims to share beautiful photography, conservation information, interesting facts, global news updates and stories of interest about big cats.

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We at The Big Cat Blog share the images we come across on the internet as both a fan of the photographer’s work and as animal lovers with a passion for felines. All images found on this blog remain the property of their respective owners. We lay no claim to any image featured here and receive no financial benefits from their use. We ensure that all images are correctly attributed to their respective owners. If material you own is featured here and you would like it removed or credited differently, you can contact us at thebigcatblog@gmail.com and expect a prompt response.

15 August 11
A domes­tic cat nurses a baby mar­gay in a pet  shel­ter. The baby mar­gay, locally known as tigrillo, was found in the  sub­urbs and taken to the shel­ter were it could be fed by the  sur­ro­gate mother until it is released back to the wild.
Photo: Raul Arboleda/​AFP/​Getty Images

A domes­tic cat nurses a baby mar­gay in a pet shel­ter. The baby mar­gay, locally known as tigrillo, was found in the sub­urbs and taken to the shel­ter were it could be fed by the sur­ro­gate mother until it is released back to the wild.

Photo: Raul Arboleda/​AFP/​Getty Images

10 March 11
This margay was photographed in Peru, as part of a research project utilizing motion-activated camera-traps.
You are invited to go WILD on Smithsonian’s interactive website, Smithsonian WILD, to learn more about the research and browse photos like this from around the world.

This margay was photographed in Peru, as part of a research project utilizing motion-activated camera-traps.

You are invited to go WILD on Smithsonian’s interactive website, Smithsonian WILD, to learn more about the research and browse photos like this from around the world.

23 December 10
Photo by: LucienTj

Photo by: LucienTj

Tags: animals margay
22 December 10
Photo by: LucienTj

Photo by: LucienTj

Posted: 7:13 AM
Photo by: Ben Cooper

Photo by: Ben Cooper

Tags: margay animals
24 November 10
The Margay (Leopardus wiedii) is a spotted cat native to Middle and South America. It is a solitary and nocturnal animal that prefers remote sections of the rainforest. The IUCN lists it as “Near Threatened”. It roams the rainforests from Mexico to Argentina. There are ten recognized subspecies.
Photo by: mottazoo

The Margay (Leopardus wiedii) is a spotted cat native to Middle and South America. It is a solitary and nocturnal animal that prefers remote sections of the rainforest. The IUCN lists it as “Near Threatened”. It roams the rainforests from Mexico to Argentina. There are ten recognized subspecies.

Photo by: mottazoo

Posted: 4:34 PM
Little-known cat lures prey by crying like a baby monkey The behavior was first witnessed back in 2005 when Wildlife Conservation Society researchers were following a group of pied tamarins — tiny monkeys the  size of squirrels — through the Amazon rain forest. While the monkeys  were feeding, both the tamarins and the researchers suddenly became  alerted to what sounded like baby tamarin distress calls.
That’s when surprised researchers saw what was hidden from the  adult tamarins: a hungry margay lurking in the branches. The cat was  actually mimicking the language of baby tamarins to lure the adults in  closer.
Read more.
Photo: Wiki Commons/GNU
Thanks to gracecomma for the story tip.

Little-known cat lures prey by crying like a baby monkey
The behavior was first witnessed back in 2005 when Wildlife Conservation Society researchers were following a group of pied tamarins — tiny monkeys the size of squirrels — through the Amazon rain forest. While the monkeys were feeding, both the tamarins and the researchers suddenly became alerted to what sounded like baby tamarin distress calls.

That’s when surprised researchers saw what was hidden from the adult tamarins: a hungry margay lurking in the branches. The cat was actually mimicking the language of baby tamarins to lure the adults in closer.

Read more.

Photo: Wiki Commons/GNU

Thanks to gracecomma for the story tip.

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh