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Home of the big cats! (And sometimes medium and also small sized wild cats.) This blog aims to share beautiful photography, conservation information, interesting facts, global news updates and stories of interest about big cats.

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We at The Big Cat Blog share the images we come across on the internet as both a fan of the photographer’s work and as animal lovers with a passion for felines. All images found on this blog remain the property of their respective owners. We lay no claim to any image featured here and receive no financial benefits from their use. We ensure that all images are correctly attributed to their respective owners. If material you own is featured here and you would like it removed or credited differently, you can contact us at thebigcatblog@gmail.com and expect a prompt response.

12 April 11
The Arabian leopard - Panthera pardus nimr
Native to the Arabian Peninsula. 
Listed as critically endangered by the IUCN since 1996 with an effective population estimate of 250.
Tentatively affirmed as a distinct subspecies by genetic analysis from a  single captive leopard from Israel of south Arabian origin.
Smallest leopard subspecies.
Threats include habitat loss, population fragmentation, prey base depletion and conflict with humans.
Photo by: Andrew Spalton, Oman camera trap
View more Arabian leopards.

The Arabian leopard - Panthera pardus nimr

  • Native to the Arabian Peninsula. 
  • Listed as critically endangered by the IUCN since 1996 with an effective population estimate of 250.
  • Tentatively affirmed as a distinct subspecies by genetic analysis from a single captive leopard from Israel of south Arabian origin.
  • Smallest leopard subspecies.
  • Threats include habitat loss, population fragmentation, prey base depletion and conflict with humans.

Photo by: Andrew Spalton, Oman camera trap

View more Arabian leopards.

Posted: 3:04 PM
The Indo-Chinese leopard - Panthera pardus delacouri
Native to Southeast Asia and southern China.
Listed as near threatened by the IUCN.
High rate of melanism, particularly for those inhabiting the Malay Peninsular. 
Habitat destruction from deforestation, prey base depletion and poaching for illegal trade are all major threats to their survival.
Photo shows a melanistic leopard caught on camera trap in Thailand from here.
View more Indo-Chinese leopards.

The Indo-Chinese leopard - Panthera pardus delacouri

  • Native to Southeast Asia and southern China.
  • Listed as near threatened by the IUCN.
  • High rate of melanism, particularly for those inhabiting the Malay Peninsular. 
  • Habitat destruction from deforestation, prey base depletion and poaching for illegal trade are all major threats to their survival.

Photo shows a melanistic leopard caught on camera trap in Thailand from here.

View more Indo-Chinese leopards.

Posted: 2:11 PM
The North Chinese leopard - Panthera pardus japonensis
Native to Northern China.
Listed as endangered by the IUCN, with a population estimate of 2,500.
Fragmented populations found in isolated mountain ranges.
Photo by: mliu92
View more North Chinese leopards.

The North Chinese leopard - Panthera pardus japonensis

  • Native to Northern China.
  • Listed as endangered by the IUCN, with a population estimate of 2,500.
  • Fragmented populations found in isolated mountain ranges.

Photo by: mliu92

View more North Chinese leopards.

Posted: 1:18 PM
The Persian leopard, also known as the Caucasian leopard - Panthera pardus ciscaucasica
Native to eastern Turkey, the Caucasus mountains, northern Iran, southern Turkmenistan and parts of western Afghanistan.
Listed as endangered by the IUCN, with an estimate of 900 - 1300 remaining wild individuals.
Population fragmentation is an urgent threat and there is believed to be no sub-population larger than 100 mature individuals. 
Poaching, prey base depletion and human disturbance caused by military presence threaten their survival. 
Photo by: Tambako the Jaguar
View more Persian leopards.

The Persian leopard, also known as the Caucasian leopard - Panthera pardus ciscaucasica

  • Native to eastern Turkey, the Caucasus mountains, northern Iran, southern Turkmenistan and parts of western Afghanistan.
  • Listed as endangered by the IUCN, with an estimate of 900 - 1300 remaining wild individuals.
  • Population fragmentation is an urgent threat and there is believed to be no sub-population larger than 100 mature individuals. 
  • Poaching, prey base depletion and human disturbance caused by military presence threaten their survival.

Photo by: Tambako the Jaguar

View more Persian leopards.

Posted: 12:25 PM
The Amur leopard, also known as the Far Eastern, Korean or Manchurian leopard - Panthera pardus orientalis
Found today only in a small part of Russia with a possible scattered population in China.
Listed as critically endangered by the IUCN and is one of the rarest cats in the world with an estimate of no more than 35 individuals in the wild.
Lost approximately 80% of their former habitat in the 1970’s - early 80’s due to logging, forest fires and land conversion.
Their coat varies in length between summer and winter from 2.5cm to 7cm long.
They have longer legs, a paler coat and wider spaced rosettes compared to other leopards. 
Photo by:Silvain de Munck
View more Amur leopards.

The Amur leopard, also known as the Far Eastern, Korean or Manchurian leopard - Panthera pardus orientalis

  • Found today only in a small part of Russia with a possible scattered population in China.
  • Listed as critically endangered by the IUCN and is one of the rarest cats in the world with an estimate of no more than 35 individuals in the wild.
  • Lost approximately 80% of their former habitat in the 1970’s - early 80’s due to logging, forest fires and land conversion.
  • Their coat varies in length between summer and winter from 2.5cm to 7cm long.
  • They have longer legs, a paler coat and wider spaced rosettes compared to other leopards.

Photo by:Silvain de Munck

View more Amur leopards.

Posted: 11:32 AM
The Javan leopard - Panthera pardus melas
Only found on the Indonesian island of Java.
Listed as critically endangered by the IUCN, with an effective population size of 250.
Habitat loss, poaching and prey base depletion all pose threats to their survival.
Melanism is relatively common among this subspecies.
Highly distinctive from mainland Asian subspecies which  may indicate that it has been separate for hundreds of thousands of  years.
Captive breeding and strictly enforced hunting laws are in place to hopefully prevent this leopard from going the same way as the Javan tiger.
Photo: AP/Tatan Syuflana, Javan leopard inside a cage prior to its release into the wild.
View more Javan leopards.

The Javan leopard - Panthera pardus melas

  • Only found on the Indonesian island of Java.
  • Listed as critically endangered by the IUCN, with an effective population size of 250.
  • Habitat loss, poaching and prey base depletion all pose threats to their survival.
  • Melanism is relatively common among this subspecies.
  • Highly distinctive from mainland Asian subspecies which may indicate that it has been separate for hundreds of thousands of years.
  • Captive breeding and strictly enforced hunting laws are in place to hopefully prevent this leopard from going the same way as the Javan tiger.

Photo: AP/Tatan Syuflana, Javan leopard inside a cage prior to its release into the wild.

View more Javan leopards.

Posted: 9:47 AM
The Indian leopard - Panthera pardus fusca
Found throughout India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and parts of Pakistan.
Listed as near threatened by the IUCN.
May soon qualify as vulnerable due to the numerous threats they face including habitat loss, poaching and conflict with humans.
Photo by: Dr. Caesar, Tadoba National Park
View more Indian leopards.

The Indian leopard - Panthera pardus fusca

  • Found throughout India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and parts of Pakistan.
  • Listed as near threatened by the IUCN.
  • May soon qualify as vulnerable due to the numerous threats they face including habitat loss, poaching and conflict with humans.

Photo by: Dr. Caesar, Tadoba National Park

View more Indian leopards.

1 February 11
The Caspian tiger, also known as the Persian tiger, Turanian tiger, Mazandaran tiger, or Hyrcanian tiger - Panthera tigris virgata
Was found throughout west and central Asia.
Listed as extinct by the IUCN.
Their  mitochondrial DNA is separated by only one letter of genetic code from that of the Siberian tiger, making them virtually identical.
It is theorized the Caspian and Siberian tiger populations were split sometime in the last century.
Exterminated by the Russian army to make room for farmer’s crops.
Last seen in the 1970’s.
Photo shows a captive Caspian tiger at the Berlin Zoo, 1899.

The Caspian tiger, also known as the Persian tiger, Turanian tiger, Mazandaran tiger, or Hyrcanian tiger - Panthera tigris virgata

  • Was found throughout west and central Asia.
  • Listed as extinct by the IUCN.
  • Their mitochondrial DNA is separated by only one letter of genetic code from that of the Siberian tiger, making them virtually identical.
  • It is theorized the Caspian and Siberian tiger populations were split sometime in the last century.
  • Exterminated by the Russian army to make room for farmer’s crops.
  • Last seen in the 1970’s.

Photo shows a captive Caspian tiger at the Berlin Zoo, 1899.

Posted: 5:13 PM
The Sumatran tiger - Panthera tigris sumatrae
Found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.
Listed as critically endangered by the IUCN.
Smallest of all extant tiger subspecies.
Have webbed toes, making them very fast swimmers
Deforestation as a result of palm oil production is wreaking havoc on Sumatran tiger populations, as is illegal poaching and human/tiger conflict. 
Photo by: StuffEyeSee
View more Sumatran tigers.

The Sumatran tiger - Panthera tigris sumatrae

  • Found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.
  • Listed as critically endangered by the IUCN.
  • Smallest of all extant tiger subspecies.
  • Have webbed toes, making them very fast swimmers
  • Deforestation as a result of palm oil production is wreaking havoc on Sumatran tiger populations, as is illegal poaching and human/tiger conflict.

Photo by: StuffEyeSee

View more Sumatran tigers.

Posted: 3:41 PM
The Malayan tiger - Panthera tigris jacksoni
Native to the Thai-Malay Peninsula.
Listed as endangered by the IUCN.
Habitat loss and poaching are the most serious threats they face.
The Malayan tiger was only identified as being a separate subspecies from the Indochinese tiger in 2004. 
This tiger is the Malaysian national icon.
Photo by: hubertk
View more Malayan tigers.

The Malayan tiger - Panthera tigris jacksoni

  • Native to the Thai-Malay Peninsula.
  • Listed as endangered by the IUCN.
  • Habitat loss and poaching are the most serious threats they face.
  • The Malayan tiger was only identified as being a separate subspecies from the Indochinese tiger in 2004.
  • This tiger is the Malaysian national icon.

Photo by: hubertk

View more Malayan tigers.

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh